How to Use a Story to Engage Your Audience

December 24, 2015

Preparing your speech and writing appropriate stories can be a challenge at the best of times, but the real challenge is in using and writing those stories in such a way that they really engage your audience. First, think about how other speakers and presenters manage to grab your attention. Sure, their stories about themselves […]

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Peter Fogel’s “Simple Ground Rules to Help Any Public Speaker ‘Find The Funny’ in Any Speech!”

December 17, 2011

I always tell my Public Speaking Coaching Clients that it is a hell of a lot easier to be speaker who uses humor in your presentations — than it is to become a comedian who has to be funny for a straight forty-five to sixty minutes. Why is that? Because the bar is lower for you. A comic must get a certain amount of laughs per minute (and is constantly judge)

A speaker does not. You see, the beauty of public speaking is that all you have to do is add just the right amount of humor to cement your important message into the hearts and minds of your listeners for optimal effect.

As in any craft, it’s important to know the rules to “Creating the Funny” out of thin air. You cannot just blurt out humorous jokes and expect your audience to burst into laughter especially if what you were
discussing moments ago was serious. That would be a disconnect and confuse your listeners.

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Peter Fogel’s “Five Terrific Tips to Help MakeYour Audience Laugh During Your Presentation!”

December 16, 2011

Regardless of their expertise, (beginner or pro) it is challenge every speaker has to overcome. I am talking of course of how to use the right amount of humor to keep your audience totally engaged with you.

Perhaps you have tried a humorous story or presented some humorous jokes only to have your audience stare back at you with that deer-in-the-headlight-look.

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Peter Fogel’s “How to Overcome the Fear of Stage Fright!”

November 25, 2011

Number seven on the list of people’s fears is fear of stage fright. Other names it goes by are performance anxiety. Simply stated it is aroused by having to perform in front of an audience. In some varying degree or another this common (and easy to fix phobia) attacks, performers, public speakers, actors and politicians

Although some people may present a slight apprehension when performing on stage, the fear of stage fright might also be linked to deeper issues like a social anxiety disorder or fear of social events
as a whole.

In some cases, fear of stage fright also presents itself in events where the individual presumes himself or herself to be performing in public – like having to talk in front of a camera… to their fellow workers… or to your employees.

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Peter Fogel’s “Creating Smooth Transitions During Your Speech!”

November 20, 2011

Ever drive a stick shift in a car?

If you have, then you soon discovered if you don’t use the clutch the right way (too fast or too slow — or not at all), the gears will collide and you’ll hear an annoying and scary grinding of metal. Most new teenage drivers know this hellacious sound. (And their fathers know this hellacious sound as they curse under their breath at the thought of having to get a new clutch job.)

What you (and your father) realized at that moment was that you did NOT have a smooth transition
between gears. You also can NOT jump from first gear to third either! What you DO need is a smooth transition between all the gears and in the right order.

Well, guess what? In the world of public speaking, it’s vital you also make a smooth transition between thoughts, ideas and stories. Not doing so will create a “grinding of the gears” effect with your audience.

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Peter Fogel’s “The #1 Important Craft: Powerful Persuasive Speaking!”

November 18, 2011

If you are professional speaker, a sales trainer, a corporate trainer or a service professional who wants to get more clients or customers, the one skill you need to learn is persuasive speaking. Although most attribute this skill to having to talk in public, the fact is that non-pros need to learn the art of persuasion during their professional (no matter what they do for a living) or personal life. However, for this article; we will deal with the realities of using it with public speaking.

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Peter Fogel’s, “How to Create Audience Empathy While Giving a Speech!”

November 5, 2011

As a professional speaker, not all of your talks will be designed to be humorous or entertaining in that fashion. Sometimes your talk may be on serious subjects to elicit donations or certain actions from people in positions of influence.

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Peter Fogel’s “Is it Alright for a Speaker or Entertainer to Laugh at Their Own Jokes!?”

November 4, 2011

It seems the jury is out on this one, with opinion divided on whether or not it is okay to laugh at your own jokes. Maybe it’s just me (although I doubt it given the number of comedians and humorous speakers who also laugh at their own jokes), but I believe the aim of a speaker is to connect with the audience, and sharing a laugh is the perfect bridge to achieve that.

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